ODFW wants people to plan for a safe weekend at Sauvie Island

Tweet ODFW wants people to plan for a safe weekend at Sauvie Island Thursday, August 31, 2017 PORTLAND, Ore. – With more warm weather in the forecast for the upcoming holiday weekend the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife reminds recreationists who want to use beaches or other recreational areas within the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area to plan ahead to avoid parking problems, and to stay safe while visiting. Parking at SIWA beaches is limited and is restricted to a first-come, first-served basis for those with wildlife area parking permits. Though permits are required to park on the wildlife area it doesn’t guarantee a place to park. The wildlife area has enough parking to accommodate approximately 1,000 vehicles, but during recent busy weekends over 5,000 vehicles have been counted near Walton and Collins beaches on Reeder Road. The additional illegally parked vehicles have caused access issues and safety concerns for visitors and for local residents. “Keeping the roads open and parking in an orderly fashion is critical to protecting the Wildlife Area, the health and safety of beach visitors, and the residents of Sauvie Island,” said SIWA Manager Mark Nebeker. Reeder Road is the primary access to Sauvie Island beaches and must remain open at all times for large emergency vehicles in the case of fire or medical emergencies. Vehicles parked illegally will be towed. During the last period of hot weather EMTs had to transport several people by ambulance, and police cited several individuals for illegal parking, DUII and other offenses. ODFW encourages people who want to drink alcohol on the wildlife area to do so responsibly, and...

Upper Snake River opens to fall Chinook fishing on Sept. 1

Tweet Upper Snake River opens to fall Chinook fishing on Sept. 1 Tuesday, August 29, 2017 ENTERPRISE, Ore. – The upper Snake River will open to hatchery fall Chinook fishing on Friday, Sept. 1. The river will be open from the Oregon – Washington border to the deadline below Hells Canyon Dam and will remain open until Oct. 31, or until a closure is announced. In addition, the reach from Cliff Mountain Rapid (at river mile 246.7) upstream to the deadline at Hells Canyon Dam will be open from Nov. 1-17. The daily bag limit will be six adipose fin-clipped Chinook salmon. Anglers can also keep an unlimited number of fin-clipped jack Chinook. Chinook jacks are salmon between 15 and 24-inches long. Fishery managers are expecting a run of 27,000 adult fall Chinook salmon, including 8,000 wild fish, to return to the Snake River above Lower Granite Dam this year. “Like spring Chinook and steelhead, returns of fall Chinook salmon are down compared to recent years,” said Jeff Yanke, ODFW District Fish Biologist in Enterprise. “But we still have plenty of fish available for harvest, and we encourage anglers to take advantage.” Only barbless hooks may be used on this stretch of the Snake River, and anglers should consult the 2017 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations for other rules that may apply. ### Contact: Jeff Yanke (541) 426-3279, Jeff.Yanke@state.or.us Read more at...

Check regulations as coastal fall salmon seasons kick off; No wild coho seasons or expanded two-rod validations this year

Tweet Check regulations as coastal fall salmon seasons kick off; No wild coho seasons or expanded two-rod validations this year Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 SALEM, Ore.—With the onset of fall salmon seasons, ODFW wants to remind anglers to check salmon and steelhead angling regulations for Oregon coastal bays and rivers. Anglers should note there are no wild coho seasons or expanded Two-Rod Validations in place this year. Overall, regulations for coastal rivers and bays remain as shown in the 2017 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations. Any changes resulting from in-season management actions for Northwest and Southwest Zone fishing rules can be found online at: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/fishing/reg_changes/northwest.asp and http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/fishing/reg_changes/southwest.asp. Anglers should consult these pages before fishing to make sure they are aware of any new changes. Under permanent rules, the use of two rods is limited to standing water bodies only (see page 14 of the 2017 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations). Allowances for the use of two rods in streams is considered annually, and implemented under temporary rules. Temporary rules were in effect in fall 2016 to allow the use of the Two-Rod Validation for salmon and steelhead angling in some coastal areas. Those temporary rules expired as planned and have not been put in place for 2017. Anglers fishing for salmon or steelhead in coastal bays and rivers during this year’s fall salmon season may only use one rod per angler. “Last year’s fall Chinook returns continued the pattern of the prior few years, with relatively strong returns,” said Chris Kern, ODFW Deputy Fish Division Administrator. “While 2017 returns are still projected to be healthy, we don’t expect them to be as...

Popular Central Oregon Coast nearshore halibut fishery reopens Sunday, Sept. 3

Tweet Popular Central Oregon Coast nearshore halibut fishery reopens Sunday, Sept. 3 Monday, August 28, 2017 NEWPORT, Ore.—Oregon recreational anglers will again be able to fish for nearshore halibut in the Central Oregon Coast Subarea (Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt.) seven days a week beginning Sunday, Sept. 3 until Oct. 31, or the adjusted quota is met.  The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) conferred with the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) on the progress of Oregon recreational halibut fisheries and the amount of quota remaining. The agencies determined that enough remained to allow the Central Coast Subarea nearshore fishery to reopen. “By shifting some quota that is likely to go unused otherwise, we are able to reopen the popular Central Coast nearshore fishery, to allow for some additional halibut fishing opportunities” said Lynn Mattes, ODFW Recreational Halibut Project Leader.  The Central Oregon Coast summer all-depth fishery remains open every other Friday and Saturday (next opening Sept. 1-2) until the quota is attained or Oct. 31. Anglers are reminded that on days when both the all-depth and nearshore fishery are open, all-depth regulations apply, regardless of depth of fishing. The Southern Oregon Subarea (Humbug Mountain to the OR/CA Border) also remains open, seven days per week until the quota is attained, or Oct. 31. Halibut sport fishery regulations can be found online at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/finfish/halibut/index.asp ### Contact: Lynn Mattes, Lynn.Mattes@state.or.us, tel. (541) 867-0300 ext. 237 Christian Heath, Christian.T.Heath@state.or.us, 541-867-0300 ext. 266 Read more at...

Dedicated non-lethal efforts fail to limit Meacham Wolf Pack depredations on private land; ODFW authorizes incremental lethal take of wolves

Tweet Dedicated non-lethal efforts fail to limit Meacham Wolf Pack depredations on private land ODFW authorizes incremental lethal take of wolves Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017 SALEM, Ore.—ODFW has confirmed four livestock depredations by the Meacham Wolf Pack of Umatilla County this month, all to the same livestock producer in the same privately-owned pasture. This is despite dedicated and substantial proactive non-lethal efforts to stop wolf-livestock conflict. The producer has removed dead livestock carcasses from the property the same day they were discovered; monitored and removed animals that were weak or could be a target of wolves; employed a range rider five days per week to monitor the location of wolves in the pasture and maintain human presence; modified their normal husbandry practices by putting larger, more mature calves in the pasture; and delayed pasture turnout for 30 days so calves were larger and to give wolves more time to move out of the area. Additionally, the producer has undertaken a speedy and expensive relocation of many of the cattle from the pasture where wolves are depredating. Normally, this private pasture would be used until October, but nearly 90 percent of cattle that typically use the area have been moved. Finally, for the past two years, the producer has chosen not to use their sheep grazing allotment on national forestland adjacent to the pasture to avoid potential wolf depredations. ODFW received a lethal control request from the producer on Aug. 21, after the fourth confirmed depredation this month. (An additional two depredations occurred in August 2016 and September 2014.) The producer requested that the entire pack be killed but ODFW...