Wildlife-vehicle collisions peak this time of year: Drivers may not salvage roadkill until 2019

Tweet See salmon spawning in local rivers Friday, October 27, 2017 ROSEBURG, Ore – Oregonians in the southern part of the state have a unique wildlife viewing opportunity to watch fall Chinook salmon spawn in local rivers. Peak spawning is now through mid-December depending on the river. Practice good wildlife viewing etiquette by watching from a short distance without disturbing the fish or walking on redds (nests). Binoculars can be handy. Note that viewing conditions can be limited after rainstorms, but water usually clears within a few days. These locations all offer excellent viewing: Douglas County Late October/early November is peak fall Chinook spawning season. South Umpqua River at the Roseburg Visitor’s Center; Happy Valley Boat Ramp in Green; Lower Cow Creek (Douglas County Road 39) and Stanton Park in Canyonville. Umpqua River at Myrtle Island in Tyee. Coho salmon spawn in late November through early December. Moderate to difficult walking along these tributaries will reward viewers: South Umpqua River at Deer Creek (Roseburg), Myrtle Creek, and the Upper South Umpqua below Tiller. Island Creek Day Use Area and Long Fibre Park on Cow Creek are also excellent. North Umpqua River at Little River along Highway 138. Umpqua River at Dean Creek, Scholfield Creek, Paradise Creek, Weatherly Creek, Brush Creek, Calapooya Creek, and Wolf Creek. Smith River at West Fork Smith River; North and Sisters creeks; North Fork Smith River; and Spencer Creek on BLM lands. Coos County Fall Chinook spawn late October through mid-December with peak spawning in mid-November. Best viewing areas include: West Fork Millicoma River beginning with the Millicoma Interpretive Center near Allegany. The center is...

Recreational sturgeon anglers get another retention day Oct. 28

Tweet Recreational sturgeon anglers get another retention day Oct. 28 Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 CLACKAMAS, Ore. — Recreational sturgeon anglers will get an additional day of retention fishing Saturday, Oct. 28 in the Columbia River from Wauna to Bonneville Dam under rules adopted today by fish and wildlife departments from Oregon and Washington. The extra fishing day was approved after staff reviewed harvest data that showed 4,700 anglers harvested fewer than 200 legal-sized sturgeon during the first sturgeon retention day on Oct. 21. Biologists attributed the poor harvest rate to heavy rain and wind, which made fishing difficult. Once again, the open area is on the mainstem Columbia from the Wauna power lines, located approximately 40 miles from the river mouth, upstream to the fishing deadline at Bonneville Dam. Legal retention size is 44- to 50-inch fork length. The bag limit is one legal-sized white sturgeon per day, and no more than two for the year, regardless of when they were caught.  By permanent regulation, all sturgeon fishing is restricted to a single barbless hook. This year marks the first time since 2013 that sturgeon retention fishing has been allowed between Wauna and Bonneville since the lower Columbia and Willamette were closed due to concerns about legal-size sturgeon abundance and other indicators of population status. The number of legal-sized sturgeon has improved since then to the point where fishery managers believe the population will support a small recreational fishery. The Willamette River from the falls to the river mouth, including Multnomah Channel, remains closed to sturgeon retention but catch and release angling is allowed. The Gilbert River remains closed...

New research looks at growing population of cougars in the mid-coast region

Tweet New research looks at growing population of cougars in the mid-coast region Thursday, October 26, 2017 Cougar – Royalty Free Image- NEWPORT, Ore.—A few decades ago, cougars in the coast range were practically unheard of. But as Oregon’s healthy cougar population has expanded into northwest Oregon from population strongholds in the Blue Mountains and south Cascades, ODFW is observing  more cougar harvest, sightings and damage complaints along the coast. Researchers have studied cougar home range sizes, population densities and diet  in the Cascades and eastern Oregon, but not along the coast. A new study aims to change that through a research effort that will collar 10 adult cougars in  the Alsea Wildlife Management Unit, which includes parts of Lincoln and Benton counties. ODFW will work with volunteer agents who have hounds to tree cougars in the study area so ODFW can immobilize them, take samples including blood and DNA, and get them fitted with a GPS collar. Location data collected from the collars will be used to calculate home range size and habitat selection. Like similar research in other parts of the state, the study will also use scat detection dogs to refine a cougar population estimate for the unit and to analyze their diet. The scat provides DNA data used in capture-recapture models that estimate population size and density. The diet analysis provides important information on what percent of common prey items (deer, elk or small mammal) are making up area cougars’ diets. Collaring of the cougars will begin this month and  will continue until 10 adults are collared or April 1, 2019.  Once a cougar is...

Crab harvesting closure extended on Oregon coast

Tweet Crab harvesting closure extended on Oregon coast Monday, October 23, 2017 Monday, October 23, 2017 SALEM, Ore.—The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announce the immediate closure of ;recreational and commercial crabbing from the north jetty of the Coquille River, which includes the bay in Bandon, to the California border due to ;elevated levels of domoic acid./> This includes crab harvested in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties. The recreational crabbing season in the ocean closed coast-wide on Oct.15 The announcement extends last week’s recreational closure. Crab harvesting from the north jetty of the Coquille River to the Columbia River remains open in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties. Despite the closure, crab and shellfish products sold in retail markets and restaurants remain safe for consumers. For more information, call ODA’s shellfish safety information hotline at (800) 448-2474 or visit the ODA shellfish closures web page at: http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/FoodSafety/Shellfish/Pages/ShellfishClosures.aspx ### Read more at...

Artwork and wine benefit Oregon’s fish and wildlife

Tweet Artwork and wine benefit Oregon’s fish and wildlife Thursday, October 19, 2017 The 2017 winning artwork of Ferruginous Hawk by Craig Fairbert of Wisconsin is featured on the label of Duck Pond’s Conservation Cuvee – Lot 5. SALEM, Ore – Enjoy fish and wildlife art, wine and music at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Show and Duck Pond Cellars’ Conservation Cuvee – Lot 5 wine release party. This free, family-friendly event is Saturday, Nov. 4 from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. at Duck Pond Cellars, 23145 Hwy 99W, Dundee. Artwork submitted by artists competing for ODFW’s 2018 Habitat Conservation, Upland Game Bird, and Waterfowl Stamp contests will be displayed. ODFW will announce the winning entry from each contest which is then used to produce collector stamps and other promotional items with proceeds benefitting Oregon’s fish and wildlife.  Visitors can vote on their favorite artwork for the People’s Choice Award, enjoy live music by Nathan Bottsford, and sample complimentary tastings of Lots 4 and 5 of the Conservation Cuvee.  At the art show, Trevor Chlanda, winemaker for Duck Pond Cellars will release Conservation Cuvee – Lot 5 with the label featuring the 2017 winning artwork of Ferruginous Hawk by Craig Fairbert of Wisconsin. Conservation Cuvee – Lot 5 is the fifth in a series of Duck Pond Cellars’ specialty wines that benefit Oregon’s wildlife. The winery crafts unique blends of Pinot Noir and donates $5 for each bottle sold to ODFW’s Conservation Program. To date, Duck Pond has donated more than $26,000 which is used to benefit species of greatest conservation need in Oregon. Conservation Cuvee...