Oregon continues delay of commercial Dungeness crab season coastwide

Tweet Oregon continues delay of commercial Dungeness crab season coastwide Thursday, December 7, 2017 NEWPORT, Ore. – The opening of the commercial Dungeness crab season will be delayed until at least Dec. 31 along the entire Oregon coast as testing shows crabs are still too low in meat yield in some areas of the coast.  The ocean commercial Dungeness crab season in Oregon is targeted to open Dec. 1, but can be delayed to ensure a high-quality product to consumers and to avoid wastage of the resource. Crab quality testing in late November and early December showed that half of the areas still did not meet the criteria for an opening. The delayed opening will allow for crabs to fill with more meat.  Testing will continue to determine if the season should open Dec. 31, be further delayed, or be split into two areas with different opening dates. In conjunction with the delayed ocean commercial season, commercial harvest of Dungeness crab in Oregon bays is now closed for the remainder of the year. The delay in the ocean commercial season at this time is not directly related to the recent recreational crabbing closures that have affected some areas of the coast (currently, south of the north jetty of the Coquille River to California). These closures are due to elevated levels of the biotoxin domoic acid detected in crab. The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) continues to monitor domoic acid levels in crab, and recreational and commercial crabbing in affected areas will remain closed or harvest restrictions will be put in place until test results indicate that crab harvested from...

Recreational crab harvesting reopens on a portion of Oregon coast

Tweet Recreational crab harvesting reopens on a portion of Oregon coast Oregon Department of Agriculture map showing where recreational crab harvesting is now open in Oregon. December 5, 2017 The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announce that recreational crabbing is now open from the north jetty of the Coquille River to the Columbia River. An area from Tahkenitch Creek (north of Winchester Bay) to Cape Foulweather (north of Newport) was previously closed due to elevated domoic acid levels. Recent crab samples taken from the area indicate these levels have dropped and remain below the alert level. This reopening of the recreational season applies to crab harvested in the ocean and in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties. Recreational crab harvesting remains closed along the southern Oregon coast from the north jetty of the Coquille River (including the Coquille estuary) to the California border. Below is a guide for what is currently open and closed for both recreational and commercial crab fishermen. Before crabbing, please confirm the status of ODFW/ODA harvest areas relative to concerns about elevated biotoxins at the website below. Recreational crabbing – Currently open in the ocean and in all bays and estuaries that are not under the health advisory. Commercial ocean crabbing – Delayed in all areas until at least December 16. Commercial bay crabbing – Commercial bay crabbing remains closed in all areas due to the delay in the ocean commercial Dungeness crab fishery. Despite the commercial closure, crab and shellfish products sold in retail markets and restaurants remain safe for consumers.
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Start planning your 2018 outdoor season: Fishing and hunting licenses make great gifts

Tweet Start planning your 2018 outdoor season: Fishing and hunting licenses make great gifts Friday, Dec. 1, 2017 SALEM, Ore.—The new 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing and 2018 Oregon Big Game Hunting Regulations  should now be available at outdoor stores and ODFW offices, or find them online at www.eregulations.com or through our new recreation website MyODFW.com. As of today (Dec. 1, 2017), 2018 licenses and tags are also on sale at license sales agents, most ODFW offices, and online. Fishing and hunting licenses make great gifts, especially for kids. Youth age 12-17 can fish (including. Columbia River Endorsement), hunt, crab and clam all year for $10 with the Youth License, or gift the Sports Pac ($55) and add all major hunting and fishing tags/validations including deer, elk, turkey, bear, cougar,  and combined angling tag. ODFW’s special big game hunt raffle tickets also make great stocking stuffers ($4.50-$11.50 for chance to win a special deer, elk, bighorn sheep, pronghorn or Rocky Mountain goat tag). To give a license, tag or other document as a gift, you need the hunter or angler’s full name and date of birth (day, month, year). If the person has had a license before, make sure you have their ODFW hunter/angler ID number which is found at the top of their license and stays the same every year. If you are purchasing for someone who has never had a license, you will need to provide their social security number in compliance with Federal and State Laws.  What’s New for 2018 Big Game Hunting: New in the 2018 regulations, significant changes are in yellow highlighted text not red...

Commission meets Dec. 8 in Salem

Tweet Commission meets Dec. 8 in Salem Dec. 1, 2017 SALEM, Ore.—The Fish and Wildlife will meet Friday, Dec. 8 in Salem at ODFW Headquarters, 4034 Fairview Industrial Drive SE. The meeting starts at 8 a.m. and follows this agenda, http://www.dfw.state.or.us/agency/commission/minutes/17/12_dec/index.asp The meeting will be livestreamed on ODFW’s Periscope and Twitter accounts. During the Director’s report at the beginning of the meeting, ODFW staff will present a working copy of the Draft Updated Wolf Conservation and Management Plan. This copy shows the edits staff have made to the Plan since April 2017 as a result of comments from stakeholders, the public and Commissioners. A panel of representatives from Wolf Program stakeholder groups has also been invited to testify at the meeting, but no other public testimony about wolves will be taken. After the Dec. 8 meeting, ODFW staff plans to complete any additional edits and present the Plan for final adoption and rule-making at the Jan. 19, 2018 Commission meeting in Salem. The Commission will set 2018 regulations for nearshore recreational and commercial groundfish fisheries. These are based on federal regulations. Black rockfish are the primary driver of Oregon’s marine fish bag limits in 2018 and next year’s allowed harvest level will decrease slightly from 2017. The 2017 recreational groundfish bag limit design did not provide year-round fishing, prompting an early closure due to quota attainment that disrupted coastal charter businesses and anglers. To try to avoid a similar disruption in 2018, ODFW staff have been meeting with stakeholders to determine the best management approach to provide sustainable harvest opportunities and maximize chances for a year-round season. Based on...

Hunters bring banned elk parts into Rogue Valley from CWD-positive states

Tweet Hunters bring banned elk parts into Rogue Valley from CWD-positive states Friday, December 1, 2017 CENTRAL POINT, Ore – Two local hunters recently brought prohibited elk parts from Colorado and Wyoming into the Rogue Valley. The elk were harvested in these states which have some deer, elk and moose infected with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), a fatal neurological disease. Oregon is still a CWD-free state. It has never been detected in captive or free-ranging deer, elk, or moose in Oregon. However, the risk of non-reversible disease transmission to wild ungulates is high because even one infected animal can affect the future of all susceptible species in the state. By bringing potentially CWD-infected elk parts containing central nervous system tissue into Oregon, these hunters jeopardized the health and population of Oregon’s deer, elk, and moose. Oregon State Police cited the hunters. This follows a similar case earlier in November where a Madras man also brought banned parts of a CWD-positive deer harvested in Montana to Oregon. ODFW collected the banned parts and incinerated them which is one of the only ways to destroy the pathogen. Duane Dungannon, State Coordinator for the Oregon Hunters Association says hunters play a critical role in keeping CWD out of Oregon. “We need hunters who go out of state to be vigilant and not bring prohibited ungulate parts back to Oregon. CWD represents perhaps the greatest threat to our big game because it has the potential to devastate our ungulate populations,” Dungannon said. OHA has been seriously concerned about preventing the spread of this disease to wild game herds. The group has advocated for...