Razor clamming closed on Clatsop beaches July 15-Sept. 30

Razor clamming closed on Clatsop beaches July 15-Sept. 30 Friday, July 13, 2018 Clatsop beaches are the most productive razor clams beaches in the state, and the annual conservation closure (July 15-Sept. 30) gives young clams a chance to get established on the beach during the summer. Photo from razor clam stock assessment survey in 2017. Click on image to enlarge ASTORIA, Ore. – Razor clamming will close 11:59 p.m. Saturday, July 14 on Clatsop County beaches for the annual conservation closure to protect newly-set young clams. Since 1967 the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has closed the 18 miles of beaches north of Tillamook Head to razor clam digging while young clams establish themselves on the beach during the summer. “We want to ensure that the Clatsop beaches continue to be productive for razor clam harvesters,” said Matt Hunter, ODFW’s Shellfish and Phytoplankton Project leader. “By not disturbing the young razor clams it increases the chance of good recruitment.” During the razor clamming harvest closure, ODFW will conduct stock assessments to determine the health of the population as it has on Clatsop beaches since 2004. Clatsop beaches are the most productive razor clam beaches in the state, accounting for more than 90 percent of total harvest. Digging for razor clams continues to be open on other state beaches though a few closures are in effect due to toxin levels. (Currently, razor clamming is closed from Cape Perpetua to the South Jetty of the Umpqua River and from Cape Arago south to California border due to unsafe toxin levels.) The best opportunities outside Clatsop beaches are in the...

Wolves confirmed in northern portion of Cascades (Wasco County)

Tweet News Release from US Fish & Wildlife Service and ODFW Wolves confirmed in northern portion of Cascades (Wasco County) Tuesday, January 16, 2018 Images of two wolves in the northern portion of Oregon’s Cascade Mountains were captured on remote ODFW cameras on the Mt Hood National Forest. Photos taken Jan. 4, 2018. THE DALLES, Ore.—At least two wolves are using an area in southern Wasco County, marking the first time multiple wolves have been confirmed in the northern portion of Oregon’s Cascade Mountains since they began returning to Oregon in the 2000s. The wolves were documented on the White River Wildlife Area and Mt Hood National Forest and have also been observed on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Several wolves are known to have dispersed through Wasco County in the past few years. A single wolf was documented in the White River Unit in December 2013. In May 2015, a wolf from the Imnaha pack travelled through the area as he dispersed to Klamath County. Later in 2015, a single wolf was documented in Wasco County. Wolves in Wasco County and anywhere west of Hwys 395-78-95 are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act, so U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the lead management agency. Additional information about Oregon’s wolf population will be available in March, after ODFW completes its annual winter surveys and minimum population count. ### Contact: Michelle Dennehy, ODFW, Michelle.N.Dennehy@state.or.us, (503) 947-6022 Elizabeth Materna, USFWS, Elizabeth_Materna@fws.gov, (503) 231-6912 Read more at...

ODFW seeks nominees to represent Oregon on Pacific fisheries council

Tweet ODFW seeks nominees to represent Oregon on Pacific fisheries council NEWPORT, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is accepting nominations for a seat on the Pacific Fishery Management Council. The deadline to request nomination materials is Feb. 8, 2018 and the three-year term begins Aug. 11, 2018. The Council manages about 119 species of groundfish, pelagic species (sardines, anchovies and mackerel) and highly migratory species (tunas, sharks and swordfish) off the coasts of Oregon, Washington and California. It includes 14 voting members representing tribal and state fish and wildlife agencies, and private citizens knowledgeable about sport fishing, commercial fishing and/or marine conservation. Several advisory councils and PFMC staff members also participate in Council meetings. The ideal candidate would be knowledgeable of fishery resource conservation and management in marine waters off the West Coast. Specific knowledge of and experience in management issues and fisheries is important, as is a strong conservation ethic. The successful candidate also must work collectively with other council members, often making difficult decisions and fulfilling the standards set forth by the Magnuson-Stevens Act. Council members make a substantial time commitment to fully participate in council business and related activities. The Oregon seat is currently held by Dorothy Lowman, who is not eligible for re-appointment. ODFW will send all nominations to the Governor’s office, which will then forward the names of at least three candidates to the National Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Department of Commerce for consideration. Successful appointees must pass an extensive FBI background check. Anyone interested in being considered, or wishing to nominate someone, must contact Cyreis Schmitt at 541-867-4741...

Train to be an Angler Education Instructor in Brookings-Harbor area

Tweet Train to be an Angler Education Instructor in Brookings-Harbor area Tuesday, January 9, 2018 SALEM, Ore – Share your love of fishing with people new to the sport – become a volunteer fishing instructor for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. ODFW’s free training for new volunteer fishing instructors is Tuesday, February 13 from 12 pm – 6 pm at the Harbor Fire Hall, 98069 West Benham Lane, Harbor. Lunch is provided and pre-registration is required by February 6. Contact Jenny Ammon at 503-947-6081 or jenny.l.ammon@state.or.us. ODFW’s Aquatic and Angling Education Program staff is hosting the training which is open to anyone 18 years of age or older and interested in becoming a volunteer fishing instructor. The training covers all elements of the program’s curriculum including basic fishing skills, stewardship, aquatic resources, and water safety. Participants also learn about events and other volunteer opportunities in their area. ### Contact: Jenny Ammon, 503-947-6081 Read more at...

ODFW seeking comment on Jewell Meadows management plan update

Tweet ODFW seeking comment on Jewell Meadows management plan update Monday, Jan. 8, 2018 TILLAMOOK, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is seeking public comment on the newly updated Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area Long Range Management Plan, which will guide activities and management decisions at the wildlife area over the coming decade. Wildlife area staff will host an open house to go over the plan and answer questions on Wednesday, Jan. 17 from 4-7 p.m. at the Jewell School Library, located at 83874 Hwy. 103, Seaside, Ore. The new plan is an update to the 2007 Long Range Management Plan. No major changes are reflected in the updated plan, according to Bryan Swearingen, wildlife area manager. The new planning document includes a summary of accomplishments over the past 10 years, along with changes to some management strategies based on completed projects. A copy of the updated plan will be available at the open house. In addition, electronic copies are available online at: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/management_plans/wildlife_areas/docs/jewel_meadows.pdf Public comments may be submitted in person at the open house, by mail, or by e-mail. To request an electronic copy (pdf) of the draft plan or to submit public comments please email Bryan.D.Swearingen@state.or.us. To submit comments in writing please mail to: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area 79878 Highway 202 Seaside, OR 97138 For additional information please contact wildlife area staff at 503-755-2264 or Rick Swart, public information officer, at 971-673-6070. ### Contact: Bryan Swearingen, 503-755-2264 Rick Swart, 971-673-6038 Read more at...