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Youth can apply to hunt deer at C2 Ranch near Medford – Deadline Nov. 30

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Youth can apply to hunt deer at C2 Ranch near Medford – Deadline Nov. 30

Tuesday, November 21, 2017
CENTRAL POINT, Ore.—ODFW’s Access and Habitat Program and the C2 Ranch are offering youth hunters with a 630T Rogue Unit youth deer tag the chance to hunt deer on the ranch’s 9,500-acre property near Medford this year.
The deadline to apply is Nov. 30 and 16 winners will be drawn on Dec. 1. Each winner will get a one-day guided hunt. A parent or other adult can also accompany the youth hunter.
Find the PDF application at https://myodfw.com/articles/c2-ranch-hunt-application and follow the directions to apply. Applications must be received by 5 p.m. on Nov. 30.
It is free to apply and free to hunt for the hunters that win the opportunity. All winners are still responsible for purchasing a hunting license and a deer tag. Winners will need to contact the ranch to set up a hunting time.
The A&H Program funds projects that provide hunter access and/or improve wildlife habitat on private land in Oregon. The A&H Program is funded primarily by a $4 surcharge on hunting licenses, big game auction and raffle tag sales.
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Contact:
Jeannine Smith
(541) 826-8774 jeannine.c.smith@state.or.us

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Madras man cited for failing to follow import restrictions to keep Oregon CWD-free; Carcass of first free-ranging Montana deer to test positive for CWD brought to Oregon

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Madras man cited for failing to follow import restrictions to keep Oregon CWD-free; Carcass of first free-ranging Montana deer to test positive for CWD brought to Oregon

November 17, 2017
SALEM, Ore.—Last week, Montana reported its first case of a free-ranging deer testing positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). The deer was harvested by a Montana hunter and its carcass was brought to Oregon by the hunter’s relative, who lives in Madras.
The parties involved failed to follow regulations that prohibit certain parts of deer, elk and moose that contain central nervous system tissue (where the prion that causes CWD is most concentrated) from being brought into Oregon. People hunting in states with CWD who harvest a deer, elk or moose may only bring back parts without spinal cord or brain tissue (e.g. antlers on a clean skullcap). See page 29 of the Oregon Big Game Regulations under “Parts Ban” for more information.
ODFW and OSP contacted the relative late last week after learning from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks that the deer had tested positive for CWD. They discovered that prohibited parts containing neurological tissue had been brought into Oregon and had been disposed of in the local area following butchering. ODFW and OSP immediately retrieved these deer parts for safe disposal.
Some parts of the deer also went to a landfill. ODFW was unable to locate and retrieve these parts, as too much time had passed since their disposal. However, the parts are deeply buried and will not come into contact with deer or elk, so are considered a low risk to free-ranging wildlife.
Following investigation, OSP Fish & Wildlife Division Troopers criminally cited the relative for Unlawful Import of Cervid Parts from a CWD State. Troopers also recovered packaged deer meat as well as additional parts of the infected deer which will be safely disposed of by ODFW Staff.
“Enforcing the regulations established to protect Oregon’s fish, wildlife and other natural resources is the Division’s top priority. The cooperation with the individual who imported the unlawful parts, as well as the close coordination with ODFW, was paramount and really aided us in completing a thorough investigation” said Tim Schwartz, OSP Fish & Wildlife Division Lieutenant. “Without this cooperation and coordination, this could’ve turned out much worse.”
Chronic Wasting Disease is caused by a protein prion that

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Fish for free the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving; #Optoutside and fish, crab, clam on Nov. 24 and 25

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Fish for free the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving; #Optoutside and fish, crab, clam on Nov. 24 and 25

Thursday, November 16, 2017
SALEM, Ore.—ODFW is waiving all fishing licensing requirements on the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving to encourage people to #optoutside with friends and family during the long holiday weekend.
On Nov. 24 and 25, 2017, all fishing, crabbing and clamming in Oregon will be free for both Oregon residents and non-residents. That means no licenses, tags or endorsements are needed on those days. All other fishing regulations apply.
Below are some good bets for fishing, crabbing or clamming on Thanksgiving weekend. For more, check ODFW’s Recreation Report, which is updated on Wednesday each week. Be sure to check water conditions and the weather forecast before heading out and dress appropriately. If you’re heading to the coast, be wary of high surf.
Trout: Lakes and reservoirs across Oregon have been stocked with trout in recent weeks, and several western Oregon lakes will be stocked the week of Nov. 20 including: Waverly Lake (Albany), Emigrant Lake (Ashland), Hyatt Reservoir (SE of Ashland), Applegate Reservoir (SW of Ashland), Expo Pond (Central Point), Faraday Lake (Estacada), Blue Lake (Fairview), St Louis Ponds (Gervais), Reinhard Park Pond (Grants Pass),  Mt Hood Pond (MHCC-Gresham), Junction City Pond, Medco Pond (east of Lost Creek Lake), Willow Lake (east of Medford), Agate Reservoir (White City/Medford), Garrison Lake (Port Orford), Walter Wirth Lake and Walling Pond (Salem), Alton Baker Canal (Springfield) and Progress Lake (Tigard).
Winter steelhead: Thanksgiving usually marks the beginning of winter steelhead season on the coast, and some early returning hatchery fish have already been caught. Check the Recreation Report for the latest on conditions.
Crabbing and clamming: While some crabbing closures are in effect due to domoic acid and ocean crabbing is closed, recreational crabbing is open in bays and estuaries and on beaches, docs, and piers from the north jetty of Coos Bay to Tahkenitch Creek and from north of Cape Foulweather to the Columbia River. Always check ODA’s shellfish page before crabbing or clamming for the latest information on any closures due to domoic acid http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/FoodSafety/Shellfish/Pages/ShellfishClosures.aspx  Bay clam and mussel harvesting are currently open along the entire Oregon coast and razor clamming is open on Clatsop County beaches.
For tips on how and where to fish,

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Commercial Dungeness crab season delayed

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Commercial Dungeness crab season delayed

Nov. 16, 2017
NEWPORT, Ore. – The traditional Dec. 1 opening of the commercial Dungeness crab season will be delayed until at least Dec. 16 along the entire Oregon coast as testing shows crabs are too low in meat yield. 
The ocean commercial Dungeness crab season in Oregon is targeted to open Dec. 1, but can be delayed to ensure a high-quality product to consumers and avoid wastage of the resource. Crab quality testing in early November showed that none of the test areas met the criteria for a Dec. 1 opening. The delayed opening will allow for crabs to fill with more meat.
A second round of crab quality testing will occur in late November or early December, and the results will be used to determine if the season should open Dec. 16, be further delayed, or be split into two areas with different opening dates.
Currently there are crab closures in effect for recreationally and commercially harvested crab from bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties due to elevated levels of domoic acid from Cape Foulweather to Tahkenitch Creek and from north jetty of Coos Bay to the California border. Crab harvesting outside of these areas remains open in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties.
In conjunction with the delayed ocean commercial season, commercial harvest of Dungeness crab in Oregon bays that are currently open will close at 12:01 a.m. Dec. 1, but may reopen if the ocean commercial fishery opens in December. Recreational harvest of Dungeness crab in the ocean off Oregon will open Dec. 1 as scheduled in areas where there are no Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) health advisories.
Despite the delay of the ocean fishery and because of the health closure in portions of the state, crab and shellfish products sold in retail markets and restaurants remain safe for consumers. The closure in the health advisory area ensures safety and the delay in the commercial ocean season promotes a high quality harvest. For more information on ODA health closures, call ODA’s shellfish safety information hotline at (800) 448-2474 or visit the ODA shellfish closures web page.
Commercial Dungeness crab is Oregon’s most valuable fishery. Last year’s season opening was also delayed but still brought in the highest ex-vessel value ever ($62.7

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ODFW art contest winners announced

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ODFW art contest winners announced

Richard Clifton’s painting of Bufflehead took first in both the Waterfowl Stamp and People’s Choice contests.

Artwork on display at Duck Pond Cellars.
– Photo by Bob Swingle, ODFW –

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
SALEM, Ore – Today the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announced the winners of its 2018 Habitat Conservation, Upland Game Bird, and Waterfowl Stamp art contests. Winners were chosen November 4 at the ODFW art show and wine release event at Duck Pond Cellars in Dundee.

Upland Game Bird Stamp Winner – Rod Frederick of Bend, Oregon with his painting of Blue Grouse.
Habitat Conservation Stamp Winner – Kip Richmond of North Carolina with his painting of Pygmy Rabbit.
Waterfowl Stamp Winner – Richard Clifton of Delaware with his painting of Bufflehead.

Frederick, Richmond and Clifton will each receive a prize award of $2,000. Winning artwork will be the face of the 2018 stamps and other promotional items to benefit Oregon’s species and habitats.
Event visitors voted for their favorite artwork out of 65 entries on display. All the artwork was popular and there were many favorites, but the winner of the People’s Choice Award was the Bufflehead by Richard Clifton. Mickey Shilling took second with his Pacific Giant Octopus painting.
See photos of all the 2018 contest entries:

Habitat Conservation
Upland Game Bird
Waterfowl

The art show was held at Duck Pond Cellars in conjunction with the release of their Conservation Cuvee – Lot 5. This is the fifth year the winery has produced unique blends of Pinot Noir that feature winning artwork from the Habitat Conservation Stamp art contest. Duck Pond then donates $5 from the sale of each bottle to ODFW’s Conservation Program.
“We look forward to the art show with Duck Pond every year,” said Andrea Hanson, ODFW Conservation Strategy Coordinator. “It is a great way to bring attention to some of Oregon’s amazing fish and wildlife that need our help, and gives us a chance to meet many new people who are also interested in Oregon’s natural wonders.”
Conservation Cuvee – Lot 5 features the 2017 Habitat Conservation Stamp winning artwork of Ferruginous Hawk by Craig Fairbert. Conservation Cuvee can be purchased.at the Duck Pond Cellars tasting

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OHRC Board to meet Nov. 14

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OHRC Board to meet Nov. 14

Nov. 7, 2017
ALSEA, Ore. — The Oregon Hatchery Research Center Board will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center, 2418 East Fall Creek Road, Alsea OR 97324.
The agenda includes an Introduction of the State Fisheries Geneticist, Dr. Kathleen O’Malley, a discussion about the OHRC Work Plan for 2018 and beyond, and election of the OHRC Board Chair/Vice-Chair for the upcoming term. The meeting is open to the public and an opportunity for public comment is scheduled.        
The OHRC is a cooperative research project between the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon State University, and the Board advises the OHRC Director on activities and functions related to the operation and maintenance of the OHRC.
Reasonable accommodations will be provided as needed for individuals requesting assistive hearing devices, sign language interpreters or large-print materials at all ODFW public meetings. Individuals needing these types of accommodations may call the ODFW Director’s Office at 800-720-6339 or 503-947-6044 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. For more information about the OHRC visit ODFW’s web site www.dfw.state.or.us/OHRC/ or contact Joseph O’Neil, Facility Manager at 541-487-5510.

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Contact:
Bruce McIntosh (503) 947-6208
Kerrie Tarkinton (541) 757-5101

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Trick or trout: southwest reservoirs get stocked with more rainbows

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Trick or trout: southwest reservoirs get stocked with more rainbows

November 3, 2017
CENTRAL POINT, Ore – Halloween may be over, but ODFW still has some treats, so take those kids away from the candy bowl this weekend and into the great outdoors for some excellent trout fishing.
Reservoirs in Jackson, Josephine and Curries counties are stocked this week and next with trophy-sized trout (12 to 15 inches) and legal-sized rainbows. Some lakes will also be stocked with fingerlings that will be ready for harvest next spring or summer.

Medco Pond near Butte Falls: 350 trophy trout and 13,000 fingerlings. The east end of Medco Pond is on private property but plenty of access is on the west end of the lake with parking along the road.
Willow Lake near Butte Falls: 2,500 legal and 500 trophy trout.
Agate Reservoir: 350 trophy and 13,000 fingerlings. A Jackson County day use parking pass is required.
Applegate and Lost Creek reservoirs: Both reservoirs offer excellent fall fishing. Lost Creek has received several trout stockings in October and Applegate is getting 1,000 trophy trout this week and 5,000 legals next week.
Lake Selmac: In addition to 200 trophy trout stocked in October, another 1,000 legal and 200 trophy trout will be stocked next week. ODFW is also stocking 10,000 fingerlings for spring anglers.
Garrison Lake near Port Orford: 1,500 trophy trout will be stocked on Friday.

Weather is expected to be varied this weekend in the Rogue Valley with only a chance of rain Saturday. The mountains could see snow showers in the morning with clearing in the afternoon. The coast should see rain.
For those new to trout fishing, ODFW offers some excellent tips.
Medco Pond is one of several reservoirs stocked with trophy and legal-sized rainbow trout.

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Contact:
Ryan Battleson or Dan VanDyke, 541-826-8774
Meghan Dugan, 541-440-3353

Read more at ODFW

OSP investigates wolf killed by elk hunter – Union County

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OSP investigates wolf killed by elk hunter – Union County

PREVIEW News Release from Oregon State Police
Preview posted on FlashAlert: November 2nd, 2017 9:56 AM
On October 27, 2017 at about 11:30AM, an OSP Fish and Wildlife Trooper and an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Biologist responded to the report of an elk hunter, who had self-reported shooting a wolf in Union County. The two responded to the hunter’s camp in the Starkey Wildlife Management Unit.

The hunter, a 38-year-old male, from Clackamas, told the trooper he had been hunting elk alone, when he repeatedly noticed some type of animal moving around him. A short time later, the hunter observed three of what he assumed would be coyotes. He said at one point one of them began to run directly at him, while another made its way around him.

The hunter stated he focused on the one running directly at him. He began to scream at it, and fearing for his life shot it one time. He said what he still believed to be a coyote died from the single shot. He stated that after the shot the other two disappeared out of sight.

The hunter said he returned to his camp and told fellow hunters what had occurred. He said he was still uncertain if what he shot was a coyote. He said they returned to the location and came to the conclusion it was a wolf. The hunter then notified ODFW and OSP.

Further investigation at the site of the shooting indicated the hunter was 27 yards from where he shot and where the wolf died. The wolf was seized and later released to ODFW for examination. The Union County District Attorney’s Office was consulted regarding the investigation and based upon the available evidence the case will not be prosecuted as this is believed to be an incidence of self-defense.

It is unlawful to kill a wolf in Oregon, except in defense of human life (and in certain instances involving wolf depredation of livestock).

According to ODFW, this incident marks the first time that a wolf has been reported shot in self-defense in Oregon since they began returning to the state in the late 1990s.

ODFW examined the wolf shot and determined

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Coquille Valley Wildlife Area reopens to public use November 10

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Coquille Valley Wildlife Area reopens to public use November 10

Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017
ROSEBURG, Ore – The Coquille Valley Wildlife Area (CVWA) reopens to public use on Friday, November 10. The area has been closed since May for tide gate construction and habitat restoration work.
Both hunters and other recreationists must possess a free hunting/access permit available at a self-check station in the parking lot along North Bank Lane. From Highway 42 in Coquille, turn onto North Bank Lane and the parking area is about a half mile on the right.
The 610-acre wildlife area is divided into the Beaver Slough and Winter Lake tracts which are accessed from a single access point at the North Bank Lane parking area. Visitors who want to use the Winter Lake tract can walk south on berms to access that area, and those who want to access Beaver Slough can walk or use a boat (that is not powered with a gasoline engine) to go north into that tract.
The Winter Lake tract is open to public use on Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays and State holidays. Beaver Slough tract is open seven days a week.
CVWA is open to game bird and waterfowl hunting, depending on when seasons are open. Check the Oregon Game Bird Regulations for specific seasons, species and shooting hours.
The wildlife area provides crucial habitat for migrating and nesting waterfowl, Oregon’s native fish, and many Oregon Conservation Strategy Species. Wildlife watchers can hike in or use kayaks or paddle boats but must stay on the wildlife area property.
This past summer, new tide gates were installed in the Coquille Basin as part of the China Camp Creek Project, benefiting both fish passage and agriculture and providing opportunities to improve habitats on CVWA. Berms and canals were reconstructed to meet current fish passage criteria.
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Contact:
Stuart Love, 541-888-5515
Tim Walters, 541-440-3353

Read more at ODFW

Wildlife-vehicle collisions peak this time of year: Drivers may not salvage roadkill until 2019

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See salmon spawning in local rivers

Friday, October 27, 2017
ROSEBURG, Ore – Oregonians in the southern part of the state have a unique wildlife viewing opportunity to watch fall Chinook salmon spawn in local rivers. Peak spawning is now through mid-December depending on the river.
Practice good wildlife viewing etiquette by watching from a short distance without disturbing the fish or walking on redds (nests). Binoculars can be handy. Note that viewing conditions can be limited after rainstorms, but water usually clears within a few days.
These locations all offer excellent viewing:
Douglas County
Late October/early November is peak fall Chinook spawning season.

South Umpqua River at the Roseburg Visitor’s Center; Happy Valley Boat Ramp in Green; Lower Cow Creek (Douglas County Road 39) and Stanton Park in Canyonville.
Umpqua River at Myrtle Island in Tyee.

Coho salmon spawn in late November through early December. Moderate to difficult walking along these tributaries will reward viewers:

South Umpqua River at Deer Creek (Roseburg), Myrtle Creek, and the Upper South Umpqua below Tiller. Island Creek Day Use Area and Long Fibre Park on Cow Creek are also excellent.
North Umpqua River at Little River along Highway 138.
Umpqua River at Dean Creek, Scholfield Creek, Paradise Creek, Weatherly Creek, Brush Creek, Calapooya Creek, and Wolf Creek.
Smith River at West Fork Smith River; North and Sisters creeks; North Fork Smith River; and Spencer Creek on BLM lands.

Coos County
Fall Chinook spawn late October through mid-December with peak spawning in mid-November. Best viewing areas include:

West Fork Millicoma River beginning with the Millicoma Interpretive Center near Allegany. The center is wheelchair accessible and kid-friendly. For the next few miles upstream, many spawning areas are visible from a vehicle.
The mouth of Glenn Creek about six miles upriver from Allegany.
Tioga Creek which can be accessed from Middle Creek Road above Fairview.
LaVerne Park on the North Fork Coquille River. Salmon are seen in the swimming hole area and jumping at the falls. They also can be seen spawning above the boulder weirs just upriver from the upper park boundary.
Frona Park on the East Fork Coquille River near Dora.
Baker Creek gravel bar/access site on the South Fork Coquille River.
Daniels Creek Road, along the last few miles of paved road before it turns

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